New Scientist Magazine - 03 June 2017 (NS030617)

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New Scientist Magazine issue NS030617 published by New Scientist

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No.3128 NEWS Boom in human gene editing as 20 CRISPR trials gear up Coloured scanning electron micro- graph (SEM) of a small cancerous tumour (orange) filling an alveolus of the human lung ANALYSIS The drug rebellion fighting big pharma to save the NHS millions drug treatment cake slice FEATURES The appetite genes: Why some of us are born to eat too much Subtle differences in how we respond to food, driven by our genes, are the true reason we can struggle to keep to the weight we want to be listening artwork 1 FEATURES Send an ear: Listening for sounds of life in the solar system The seismic echoes of Jupiter’s icy moons could teach us more about their hidden oceans than any picture – and help us gauge their potential for life playing FEATURES First words: The surprisingly simple foundation of language How children learn language is one of the oldest controversies in linguistics. But speaking may just be a matter of grasping the relationship between things Kasparov FEATURES We don’t need to lose out to machines, says the man who did Two decades after his devastating loss to a supercomputer, chess legend Garry Kasparov is embracing his old adversary TABLE OF CONTENTS Leaders Collective rather than individual action can beat obesity NEWS UPFRONT Governments sued over climate change, with banks and firms next Sea stars filmed hunting squid and squabbling over eating it Trump’s budget jettisons ‘irreplaceable’ marine mammals agency New Zealand joins the space race with Electron rocket launch Tumour-tracking drug that kills cancer approved in the US Amazing pictures show cyclones swirling above Jupiter’s poles 60 Seconds NEWS & TECHNOLOGY Boom in human gene editing as 20 CRISPR trials gear up Nowcasting may help forecast big earthquakes in 53 major cities Game theory says you should charge your friends to borrow things Is ADHD a sleep disorder? Stimulant drug improves symptoms Curious AI learns by exploring game worlds and making mistakes Gene tweak in gut bacteria could turn faeces blue if you’re ill Underwater drones use sound to send snaps of the ocean floor Newly-evolved microbes may be breaking down ocean plastics Huge impact could have smashed early Earth into a doughnut shape Could cannabis help crack cocaine addicts kick the habit? Strange cosmic radio burst pinned down to giant stellar nursery Monkey mafia steal your stuff, then sell it back for a cracker Learning to read and write rewires adult brain in six months IN BRIEF See-through frog has heart you can see beating through its chest App lets stadium crowds display giant messages with their phones Traumatic beetle sex causes rapid evolutionary arms race Saturn’s moons could reassemble from wreckage of collisions Waltzing robot teaches beginners how to dance like a pro Floating in microgravity gives bacteria permanent genetic boost Hot, sleepless nights will get more common with climate change Tree-climbing goats spit out and disperse valuable argan seeds ANALYSIS The drug rebellion fighting big pharma to save the NHS millions Think the UK has a social care crisis now? Just wait until 2025 How to get scientists and politicians talking the same language Diseases are global, so it’s time for global emergency response APERTURE Inside the SPIDER facility, preparing for nuclear fusion tests FEATURES The appetite genes: Why some of us are born to eat too much Send an ear: Listening for sounds of life in the solar system First words: The surprisingly simple foundation of language PEOPLE We don’t need to lose out to machines, says the man who did CULTURE Your Brain Is a Time Machine: Why we need to talk about time Hello, Robot: The show that braves the future More Old Scientist: Space travel? Waste of money Regulars LETTERS, FEEDBACK, THE LAST WORD

Additional Information

Publisher New Scientist
Title New Scientist Magazine
Frequency Weekly
Sector Hobbies & Interests
Date 3 Jun 2017
Month June
Year 2017