New Scientist Magazine -19 November 2016 (NS191116)

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New Scientist Magazine issue NS191116 published by New Scientist

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No.3100 NEWS First home brain implant lets ‘locked-in’ woman communicate scan Person in spacesuit standing in front of a large door in a large white industrial room FEATURES How to think about 2076 Futurology is doomed to failure, and a lot can happen in 60 years. But there are ways to make informed guesses about what is over the horizon robot FEATURES The world in 2076: Machines outsmart us but we’re still on top Great thinkers have long feared the “technological singularity”, in which the machines we designed run rings around us. Here’s why it probably won’t happen sputnik FEATURES The inventions of our lifetime, picked by the people who know Our expert panel offers up 10 of the greatest inventions to appear since New Scientist was launched, from Kevlar to a smarter way of dealing with information universe FEATURES The world in 2076: The theory of everything is here – we think An inspirational leap could unify quantum gravity and general relativity – but with physicists still struggling, baby steps forward might be more likely C0208125-ITER_Reaction_Vessel FEATURES The world in 2076: Artificial starlight has made energy free Even if we finally achieve the dream of controlled nuclear fusion on Earth, it will carry an environmental cost GettyImages-124369160 FEATURES The world in 2076: Human-made life forms walk the earth Synthetic life is well within our capabilities – but creating a free-living, independently evolving life form also comes with huge risks Mars FEATURES The world in 2076: Thousands of people have settled on Mars Overcoming all the challenges of colonising the Red Planet is a huge feat, but the pioneers won’t live a gilded existence F0129139-CRISPR-CAS9_gene_editing_complex FEATURES The world in 2076: Genetically engineered people are everywhere Gene editing will be routinely available to improve health, but using it to create superhuman individuals is a more distant prospect manufactured food FEATURES The world in 2076: Now we can easily make whatever we want When machines can make anything imaginable almost for free – the real-life Star Trek replicator – concepts of ownership and work will be radically transformed E8X750 FEATURES The world in 2076: Goodbye electicity, hello superconductivity The long-awaited discovery of room-temperature superconductors will mean batteries that stay charged forever and a dramatically more efficient world people FEATURES The world in 2076: The population bomb has imploded Fears of massive overpopulation proved unfounded but now we live in a world where children are rare and most people are old alien FEATURES The world in 2076: We still haven’t found alien life Decades of futile searching for extraterrestrial life will make us refine our science and re-examine our role in the universe p301m1148408 FEATURES The world in 2076: We fixed the climate but still face turmoil Epic geoengineering megaprojects have saved us from warming, but now we can’t stop or we’ll unleash a catastrophe GettyImages-170050300 FEATURES The world in 2076: Civilisation was more fragile than we thought We might survive a major pandemic or other catastrophe, but it will show up our economic and social failings and set us back centuries AP9604040973 FEATURES The world in 2076: The anti-science backlash has begun With the public convinced that innovation is only helping the rich get richer, humans will spiral downwards into relying on dogma and half-truths nuclear cloud FEATURES The world in 2076: That nuclear war was a bit of a bummer Even if Russia and the US keep their fingers off the nuclear button, a small-scale nuclear conflict is well capable of trashing the planet Lem FEATURES Stanislaw Lem: The man with the future inside him From the 1950s, science fiction writer Stanisław Lem began firing out prescient explorations of our present and far beyond. His vision is proving unparalleled TABLE OF CONTENTS Leaders The world needs scientific values more than ever NEWS UPFRONT New Zealand earthquake could trigger a mega-quake NHS does have the power to give HIV PrEP drug, say judges Superagers with amazing memories have Alzheimer's brain plaques 80,000 reindeer have starved to death as Arctic sea ice retreats Gender equality is boosted by better infection control China’s space station now has insects, weeds and rice on board 2016 now looks dead set to become the hottest year on record 60 Seconds THIS WEEK First home brain implant lets ‘locked-in’ woman communicate Twisted light beams a greeting over a record distance of 143 km Food made from natural gas will soon feed farm animals – and us Blood from human teens rejuvenates body and brains of old mice Using egg leftovers could double the number collected in IVF Mystery cosmic radio blasts come with side of gamma rays IN BRIEF Smallest sliver of time yet measured sees electrons fleeing atom The sweet scent of plastic lures seabirds to a dangerous snack UK red squirrels are carrying leprosy and have been for decades Bunnies eat toxic leaves to conquer Australia's snowy peaks Scouts and Guides grow up to have better mental health at age 50 Spacecraft could taste Europa's sea by sampling its atmosphere Quantum computers can talk to each other via a photon translator Giggling rats reveal the most ticklish part of our brains ANALYSIS What Trump means for climate change, health and nuclear weapons Primal fear can blinker our decisions, even in elections APERTURE Hacker, the humpback whale who got tangled in an internet cable FEATURES How to think about 2076 The world in 2076: Machines outsmart us but we’re still on top The inventions of our lifetime, picked by the people who know The world in 2076: The theory of everything is here – we think The world in 2076: Artificial starlight has made energy free The world in 2076: Human-made life forms walk the earth The world in 2076: Thousands of people have settled on Mars The world in 2076: Genetically engineered people are everywhere The world in 2076: Now we can easily make whatever we want The world in 2076: Goodbye electicity, hello superconductivity The world in 2076: The population bomb has imploded The world in 2076: We still haven’t found alien life The world in 2076: We fixed the climate but still face turmoil The world in 2076: Civilisation was more fragile than we thought The world in 2076: The anti-science backlash has begun The world in 2076: That nuclear war was a bit of a bummer PEOPLE Stanislaw Lem: The man with the future inside him CULTURE Playing politics: exposing the flaws of nudge thinking Scurvy: A tale of the sailors' curse and a cure that got lost Why rest and relaxation are such a serious business

Additional Information

Publisher New Scientist
Title New Scientist Magazine
Frequency Weekly
Sector Hobbies & Interests
Date 19 Nov 2016
Month November
Year 2016